PEOPLE AND PLACES

PEOPLE AND PLACES

Saturday, March 21, 2015

Russia's new supersonic bomber can outrun Britain's best fighter jet: RAF's next-gen fighter passes key weapons test

 

 

 

 

 

 

Russia's new supersonic bomber can outrun Britain's best fighter jet... and Vladimir Putin could soon send them our way 

  • Russian President Putin is about to unleash a new supersonic bomber
  • The Blackjack will be able to outrun the RAF's fastest fighter jets
  • Last month Russian Bear aircraft were spotted on sorties near Cornwall
  • But Blackjack is three times faster than the Bear and can fly four times further than the fighters that make up UK's Quick Reaction Alert squadrons
  • The Russian aircraft has a range of 7,600 miles without refuelling

Russian President Vladimir Putin is ready to unleash a supersonic bomber towards Britain which can outrun the Royal Air Force’s fastest fighter jets.

The introduction of the Blackjack follows sorties by other Russian aircraft near Cornwall last month which disrupted commercial flights and sparked major security fears.

On that occasion, RAF pilots flying Typhoon jets easily caught up with two propeller-driven Bear bombers and directed their crews away from UK airspace.

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The top speed is the same... but our range is less: British Typhoon compared to the Russian Blackjack

The top speed is the same... but our range is less: British Typhoon compared to the Russian Blackjack

The incident led to Russia’s ambassador to Britain being summoned to the Foreign Office to explain the mission.

But the Blackjack (Tu-160M) is three times faster than the Bear and can fly four times further than the fighters that make up Britain’s Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) squadrons, according to experts.

The bomber, also known as the White Swan because of its shape and huge wingspan, has just re-entered service in the Russian air force following a design overhaul.

Experts say it is now more than a match for any UK aircraft, including the Typhoon, which is used to protect British airspace.

Like the Blackjack, the Typhoon can reach Mach 2 – about 1,500mph.

Russian President Vladimir Putin (pictured) has prioritised areas of defence where he thinks he can be superior to the West, according to experts

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (pictured) has prioritised areas of defence where he thinks he can be superior to the West, according to experts

But while the Russian aircraft has a range of 7,600 miles without refuelling, the Typhoon’s limit is 1,800 miles, meaning the Blackjack could maintain its maximum speed for much longer than its British counterpart without air-to-air refuelling.

Dr Igor Sutyagin, Senior Russian Research Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) in London, said: ‘The Tu-160M now has greater thrust and fuel efficiency and it can carry a larger payload of conventional missiles.

‘The test flights were successful and the aircraft is now very potent. There is simply no British aircraft of its calibre or purpose. It is the largest bomber in the world.’

The first two revamped Blackjacks passed a series of test flights last December and have now been passed for service.

They are being prepared for possible action at air bases in Russia that are within easy striking distance of Britain.

One, Monchegorsk air base near Murmansk, northern Russia, is just 1,000 miles from the British Isles.

Ten more Blackjacks will be modernised before 2020.

Dr Sutyagin added that the Blackjacks’ revamp was part of a plan by President Putin to boost both Russia’s arsenal of military hardware and its troop numbers.

It comes at a time of heightened tension between Russia and the West, and while Britain’s Armed Forces are shrinking due to spending cuts.

‘President Putin has prioritised areas of defence where he thinks he can be superior to the West,’ said Dr Sutyagin.

‘He has also improved his long-range nuclear missiles such as the Bulava, which is now very hard to detect on launch. It is lighter and more compact, too, so more warheads can be fitted into a submarine.

'He has also committed to the T-50 low-visibility jet. This stealth jet could lead to potentially massive changes in the distribution of military power around the world.

'He is doubling the number of his Special Forces troops, as well.’

An RAF Typhoon aircraft from Number XI Squadron shadows a Russian Bear-H aircraft (file picture)

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An RAF Typhoon aircraft from Number XI Squadron shadows a Russian Bear-H aircraft (file picture)

Hammond: Russia could pose greatest threat to UK security

Between now and 2020, the size of the Spetsnaz (Special Forces) regiments will increase from 15,000 to 32,000.

Trained to the same level as Britain’s Special Air Service (SAS), they were used in Chechnya and, most recently, in eastern Ukraine where they are understood to have organised a guerilla campaign by Russian separatists.

Experts also believe Putin could send the Spetsnaz to the Baltic states of Latvia and Lithuania, both Nato members, to organise resistance among ethnic Russians.

Dr Sutyagin added: ‘Military activity in Crimea and eastern Ukraine has borne all the hallmarks of the special Russian units – it would be a mistake to believe the same tactics might not be applied elsewhere.’

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) has been following the Blackjack and Russian stealth-jet programmes. But while the Typhoon cannot match the Blackjack’s range, RAF sources insist it is a superior aircraft overall given its set of air-to-air weapons and its agility.

An MoD spokesman said: ‘The primary role of the Royal Air Force is to defend the UK. We are aware of recent Russian military activity.

'RAF Typhoon fighters will continue to routinely intercept, identify and escort Russian aircraft that travel through international airspace within the UK’s area of interest.’

 

RAF's next-gen fighter passes key weapons test ahead of 2018 lift-off 

  • Despite their lethal apearance, the weapons on the F-35B are 'dummies' used for testing
  • The American-built fighter needs to be compatible with RAF's ASRAAM and Paveway IV weapons
  • RAF has ordered four of the F-35B Lightning II fighter, which cost $400billion to develop and was hit by delays

These new pictures show the RAF's next-generation F-35B fighter, bristling with fearsome state-of-the-art weaponry.

However, the deadly-looking weapons are actually trial or 'dummy' ordnance, which are identical in fit and form to their lethal counterparts but incapable of causing damage.

A UK test team including personnel from BAE Systems, has successfully completed initial aircraft handling trials for ASRAAM and Paveway IV weapons on the F-35B Lightning II aircraft at Patuxent River Naval Air Station in Maryland, United States.

The 'weapons' were tested on the Short Take-off Vertical Landing (STOVL) F-35B for the first time during a series of flights from the US Navy's test facility.

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Two F-35B STOVL aircraft, flown by Billie Flynn, Lockheed Martin's F-35 test pilot and Squadron Leader Andy Edgell from the RAF, completed 9 flights with ASRAAM missiles and  Paveway IV laser guided bombs. The flights involved different configurations of both weapons types on the aircraft

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Two F-35B STOVL aircraft, flown by Billie Flynn, Lockheed Martin's F-35 test pilot and Squadron Leader Andy Edgell from the RAF, completed 9 flights with ASRAAM missiles and Paveway IV laser guided bombs. The flights involved different configurations of both weapons types on the aircraft

The 'weapons' were tested on the Short Take-off Vertical Landing (STOVL) F-35B for the first time during a series of flights from the US Navy's test facility

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The 'weapons' were tested on the Short Take-off Vertical Landing (STOVL) F-35B for the first time during a series of flights from the US Navy's test facility

The initial tests are an important step in integrating weapons onto the F-35B, allowing test pilots to understand how they affect the way the aircraft performs and handles.

The planes feature short take-off and vertical landing (STOVL) technology and the latest stealth and intelligence surveillance, target acquisition and reconnaissance (ISTAR) technology.

The RAF already uses ASRAAM air-to-air missiles and Paveway IV - a 500lb weapon capable of taking out a small compound - on its --existing combat air fleet. The successful tests are a step towards full integration between the current and future fast jets that will be used by the RAF and the UK's Royal Navy from 2018.

Two F-35B STOVL aircraft, flown by Billie Flynn, Lockheed Martin's F-35 test pilot and Squadron Leader Andy Edgell from the RAF, completed nine flights with MBDA's ASRAAM missiles and Raytheon's Paveway IV laser guided bombs. The flights involved different configurations of both weapons types on the aircraft.

 

 

The RAF already uses ASRAAM air-to-air missiles and Paveway IV - a 500lb weapon capable of taking out a small compound - on its existing combat air fleet. The successful tests are a step towards full integration between the current and future fast jets that will be used by the RAF and the UK's Royal Navy from 2018

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The RAF already uses ASRAAM air-to-air missiles and Paveway IV - a 500lb weapon capable of taking out a small compound - on its existing combat air fleet. The successful tests are a step towards full integration between the current and future fast jets that will be used by the RAF and the UK's Royal Navy from 2018

The successful tests will be followed by the next stage of weapons testing due to take place in early 2015. These tests will involve weapon separation and then guided releases of both ASRAAM and Paveway IV from the aircraft.

BAE Systems' lead test pilot for F-35, Pete 'Wizzer' Wilson, said: 'The team at Patuxent River has got over two thousand hours of flying under their belts for the F-35B variant and the handling and performance of the aircraft has shone through throughout. These latest trials were no exception and help us to move confidently into the next phase of weapons testing.'

J.D. McFarlan, Lockheed Martin's vice president for F-35 test & verification from the Joint Strike Fighter programme added: 'These trials show the truly international nature of the F-35 enterprise - being led out of a U.S. Navy facility, involving a joint UK Ministry of Defence and industry team, working alongside the U.S. Department of Defence and Lockheed Martin.

'And the test results for one partner will benefit all, further demonstrating the versatility and capability of the F-35 as a multi-role platform.'

The aircraft were equipped with 'dummy' Paveway IV 500lb laser guided bombs. File picture

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The aircraft were equipped with 'dummy' Paveway IV 500lb laser guided bombs. File picture

Deadly effect: An explosion after a Paveway bomb strike on a Libyan warship launched from an RAF Tornado in 2011

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Deadly effect: An explosion after a Paveway bomb strike on a Libyan warship launched from an RAF Tornado in 2011

Britain on Monday announced it had signed a contract with US manufacturer Lockheed Martin to buy the first of 14 F-35B combat jets.

The four Lightning II stealth combat aircraft will operate from both of the Royal Navy's forthcoming new aircraft carriers and from Royal Air Force land bases, with another 10 due to be ordered over the next five years.

F-35 FIGHTER PROFILE

Aircrew: One

Max speed: 1.6Mach (1,217.3mph)

Length: 51ft

Wingspan: 35ft

Max. altitude: 50,000ft

The first batch is expected to be delivered in 2016 and will take up station in 2018.

'The investment we are making in the F-35 aircraft will ensure we are securing the skies for decades to come, providing the UK with the latest stealth technology and multi-role aircraft capability,' said Philip Dunne, minister for defence equipment support and technology.

The British government has long planned to provide its air and naval forces with F-35Bs and signed an agreement in principle to buy the four jets last month.

The F-35 should have appeared at this year's Farnborough International Airshow near London, but was grounded by technical problems and could not cross the Atlantic Ocean.

Britain's navy is currently without an aircraft carrier but a new carrier, HMS Queen Elizabeth, is due to go into service in 2020 with another, HMS Prince of Wales, to follow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The defense system in Russia’s 5th-generation T-50 jetfighter can neutralize enemy plane stealth capability.

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… from Sputnik News,   Moscow

The new Russian Armata T-14

The new Russian Armata T-14

[ Editor’s Note:  The T-50 has gotten a lot of publicity this year during its test trials, partially due to the need to boost the Russian public’s pride in their technical abilities, which is underpinned by their world-class educational system, where top high school grads are at the second year of the West’s college level.

As we have seen with the Armatta tank series, a modular construction design allows for much more flexible upgrading on one particular component.

The first example of that is the new larger gun for the second generation, which will fit on top of the carriage and crew compartment because it is a self-contained unit.

I suspect a lot of testing has been going into the T-50 airframe and avionics, whose similar design specs have tormented America’s F-35 white elephant — but for the F-35’s failure, no one in engineering or management has been shot yet.

But no dummies they, as the US defense contractors responsible for the F-35 disaster are lining up to go back to the trough for billions more to produce something superior to the T-50. It would be cheaper for us to fly over and import a version of the T-50, when one comes available.

The big shock to me is the admission that the Russians, starting production in 2016, are only scheduled to deliver 55 of them by 2020… when they need several hundred. Curious… Jim W. Dean ]

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Sukhoi_T_50_PAK_FA_by_nellenmellen

–  First published  …  May 29,  2015  –

An active defense system developed for Russia’s fifth-generation T-50 jetfighter is also able to neutralize enemy planes’ stealth capability, RIA Novosti reported Friday, citing the press service of the Himalaya system’s designers, the Radioelectronic Technologies Concern [KRET].

The Sukhoi PAK FA fighter jet, also known as T-50, is ready to go into production next year, and boasts innovative technology which renders the pilot one part of the plane’s control system.

“The PAK FA is already to some degree a flying robot, where the aviator fulfils the function not only of pilot, but is actually one of the constituent parts of the flying apparatus,” explained Vladimir Mikheyev, deputy head of KRET, which is a unit of Rostech Corporation.

The use of composite materials, innovative technologies, advanced avionics and engines ensure the T-50’s extremely low level of radar, optical and infrared visibility.

At present the US is the only country to have operational fifth-generation aircraft – the F22 Raptor and F35 Lightning II.

KRET has also created for the T-50 the upgraded BINS-SP2M strapdown inertial navigation system that autonomously processes navigation and flight information, determines position and motion parameters in the absence of satellite navigation, and can integrate with GLONASS, Russia’s space-based satellite navigation system.

The T-50 is set to replace the Sukhoi Su-27 fourth generation fighter jet, which entered service with the Soviet Air Force in 1985, and the Mig-29, which entered service in 1983.

In December 2014 Russia’s United Aircraft Corporation announced that production of the fighter was ready to begin in 2016, following the completion of the testing phase.

55 PAK FA jets will be delivered to the Russian Air Force by 2020.

 

Astute class submarines that will take the Royal Navy's fighting capabilities into the 21st Century.

The 97m long, 7,400 tonne nuclear-powered attack submarine Artful has cost taxpayers more than £1billion but, along with its sisters, sets a new standard in weapons load and stealth.

Armed with both Spearfish heavy torpedoes and Tomahawk cruise missiles, Artful's design marks a shift away from a Cold War focus on anti-submarine warfare to a concept of 'Maritime Contributions to Joint Operations'.

Artful, the third highly-complex Astute class submarine designed and built by BAE Systems for the Royal Navy, appears outside her construction hall for the first time

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Artful, the third highly-complex Astute class submarine designed and built by BAE Systems for the Royal Navy, appears outside her construction hall for the first time

Facts and stats: Armed with Spearfish torpedoes and Tomahawk cruise missiles, Artful's design marks a shift away from a Cold War anti-submarine warfare

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Facts and stats: Armed with Spearfish torpedoes and Tomahawk cruise missiles, Artful's design marks a shift away from a Cold War anti-submarine warfare

The Tomahawk cruise missiles she will carry are claimed to have an accuracy of just a few metres over a range of within 1,240 miles, giving Artful the ability to support ground forces anywhere in the world.

More than 39,000 acoustic tiles mask the vessel's sonar signature, meaning she slips through the seas with less noise than a baby dolphin.

Yet her sonar is said to be so powerful it can detect ships leaving harbour in New York City from a listening point below the waters of the English Channel, 3,000 nautical miles away.

Artful got her toes wet for the first time yesterday, more than 24 hours after she first emerged from the Devonshire Dock Hall in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria. She was officially named last September by Amanda, Lady Zambellas, wife of the Royal Navy’s First Sea Lord, Admiral Sir George Zambellas.

Stealth: More than 39,000 acoustic tiles mask Artful's sonar signature, meaning she will slip through the seas with less noise than a baby dolphin

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Stealth: More than 39,000 acoustic tiles mask Artful's sonar signature, meaning she will slip through the seas with less noise than a baby dolphin

Hunter: Yet her sonar is so powerful it can detect ships from 3,000 nautical miles away - equivalent to the distance between the English Channel and New York

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Hunter: Yet her sonar is so powerful it can detect ships from 3,000 nautical miles away - equivalent to the distance between the English Channel and New York

Expensive: The 97m long, 7,400 tonne nuclear-powered attack submarine Artful has cost taxpayers more than £1billion

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Expensive: The 97m long, 7,400 tonne nuclear-powered attack submarine Artful has cost taxpayers more than £1billion

Stuart Godden, Astute Programme Director for BAE Systems, said: 'The launch of Artful is another significant step forward in the Astute programme.

'Building on past experiences we’ve been able to launch her in the most advanced state of construction of any submarine to be built in Barrow. This allows us to now fully concentrate on the test and commissioning activities required to get her to sea.

'Moving a submarine of this size from its build hall to the water is very challenging. It’s testament to the experience and careful planning of the team involved that Artful is now ready for the next phase in her programme.

'Witnessing a submarine move out of the hall and be readied for launch is truly inspiring and a source of great pride to the thousands who have played a part in getting Artful to this stage.'

Artful will now undergo a series of complex tests to prove the safety and operability of her systems before she departs BAE Systems’ site for sea trials.

Tomahawk missile from Astute class sub hits its target

 

Natural habitat: Artful got her toes wet for the first time yesterday, 24 hours emerging from the Devonshire Dock Hall in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria

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Natural habitat: Artful got her toes wet for the first time yesterday, 24 hours emerging from the Devonshire Dock Hall in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria

Final checks: Artful will now undergo a series of tests to prove the safety and operability of her systems before she departs BAE Systems' site for sea trials

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Final checks: Artful will now undergo a series of tests to prove the safety and operability of her systems before she departs BAE Systems' site for sea trials

The Ministry of Defence’s Director Submarines, Rear Admiral Mike Wareham, said: 'The Astute programme is making real progress and the sight of the third submarine afloat in the water is a reflection of the hard work of both the MOD and industry.

'The launch of this submarine brings it a step closer to entering into service where it will provide a key capability for the Royal Navy and an essential component of the Submarine Service into the future.'

BAE Systems, the prime contractor in the Astute programme, is the UK's only designer and builder of nuclear powered submarines - one of the most complex engineering programmes in the world today.

The first two submarines in the Astute class – HMS Astute and HMS Ambush – have now been handed over to the UK Royal Navy, while the remaining five are in various stages of construction.

This is NOT a picture of a fighter jet breaking the sound barrier: Biggest myth on the internet busted

  • Aviation photographer Darek Siusta captured images of a plane approaching the sound barrier
  • The photos were taken at the Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana Air Show, in Virginia Beach, Virginia
  • They show a Super Hornet fighter travelling at more than 760mph (1,225km/h) - the speed of sound
  • When this happens sound waves are unable to propagate away from the aircraft as it moves forward
  • This creates a 'sonic boom' of noise - and a vapour cone accompanies the plane at transonic speeds

The moments when a jet fighter created a vapour cone as it approached the sound barrier have been captured in stunning detail in a set of photos - but it is not the moment the jet broke the sound barrier, as such images are commonly mislabelled.

When a plane travels at high speeds the change in pressure can cause water to condense around the vehicle, making an odd conical shape often associated with breaking the sound barrier.

However the effect occurs before the plane exceeds the speed of sound.

That moment, though, is accompanied by a 'sonic boom', which will be heard by observers as the plane passes them.

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The sight of sound: The moment a jet fighter approached the sound barrier has been captured in stunning detail by this set of photos. Keen aviation photographer Darek Siusta's series of shots were all taken within a second as the plane flew past

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The sight of sound: The moment a jet fighter approached the sound barrier has been captured in stunning detail by this set of photos. Keen aviation photographer Darek Siusta's series of shots were all taken within a second as the plane flew past

Keen aviation photographer Darek Siusta's series of shots were all shot within a second as the Super Hornet fighter created the shock waves at around 760mph (1,225km/h).

WHAT IS A VAPOUR CONE?

A vapour cone occurs when a plane travelling at very high speeds passes through a humid pocket of air.

The increase in air pressure caused by the plane’s pressure envelope makes the water instantly condense, creating the odd effect.

They are often incorrectly said to be the moment a plane passes the sound barrier.

However, they are not related to breaking the sound barrier or sonic booms – they are simply only associated with planes travelling at high speeds, often ones that can fly faster than the speed of sound, hence the association.

It took Mr Siusta, 36, seven hours to drive from his home in New York to the Naval Air Station (NAS) Oceana Air Show, in Virginia Beach, Virginia, where the photos were taken.

To capture the shock waves caused by the boom he shot each frame using an extraordinarily fast 1/4,000 shutter speed.

The US Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet, which has a top speed of 1,190mph (1,1915km/h), was flown by the Strike Fighter Squadron 106, also known as the 'Gladiators'.

Mr Siusta, who is originally from Poland, said: 'These pictures were taken in less than a second.'

The boom occurs when an aircraft travels through the air faster than the speed of sound.

As the plane passes through the air it creates a series of pressure waves in front of it and behind it, similar to the bow and stern waves created by a boat.

These waves travel at the speed of sound, and as the speed of the plane increases, the waves are forced together because they cannot get out of the way of each other.

Eventually they merge into a shock wave, which travels at the speed of sound - approximately 760mph (1,225 km/h).

And a vapour cone also forms behind the aircraft as atmospheric water is condensed. 

An incredible SONIC BOOM is created by military jet

 

The Super Hornet fighter created the vapour cone as it approached the sound barrier at around 760mph (1,225km/h). It is not to be confused with a sonic boom, which is the noise wave created when it breaks the barrier

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The Super Hornet fighter created the vapour cone as it approached the sound barrier at around 760mph (1,225km/h). It is not to be confused with a sonic boom, which is the noise wave created when it breaks the barrier

The boom occurs when an aircraft travels through the air faster than the speed of sound which creates shock waves. As the plane passes through the air it creates a series of pressure waves in front of it and behind it, similar to the bow and stern waves created by a boat

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The boom occurs when an aircraft travels through the air faster than the speed of sound which creates shock waves. As the plane passes through the air it creates a series of pressure waves in front of it and behind it, similar to the bow and stern waves created by a boat

WHAT IS A SONIC BOOM?

A sonic boom is the sound caused by an object travelling through the air faster than the speed of sound.

When it exceeds the speed of sound, sound waves can no longer propagate away before the plane overtakes them.

This creates a sonic boom of sound and a shockwave.

One common myth is that the sonic boom is heard only when the plane first breaks the barrier, which is not true. Instead, it continues as long as it is ahead of the sound barrier.

Mr Siusta, a project manager for a security company, added: 'I have photographed sonic booms before with other jets including the F-16 and F-22 Raptor.

'The east coast of the US gives you a good chance to take these type of pictures.'

He continued: 'I've attended this air show since I got my first DSLR camera in 2009.

'Driving from New York took around seven hours but I was one of the first guests to be able get into the right spot for photos.

'I take these kind of pictures with aperture priority f4, iso 400, and the exposure depends on the weather conditions.

'When I take other fighter pictures then I keep the ISO low - at around 100 - to have the best quality image.'

Mr Siusta used a Nikkor 500mm f4 VRII mounted on the Nikon D4 - his primary lens - to capture the sonic boom.

He said: 'It gives me optimal focus speed, quality, and shutter speed.'

The US Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet, shown, which has a top speed of 1,190mph (1,1915km/h), was being flown at the NAS Oceana Air Show in Virginia Beach, Virginia by the Strike Fighter Squadron 106, also known as the 'Gladiators'

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The US Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet, shown, which has a top speed of 1,190mph (1,1915km/h), was being flown at the NAS Oceana Air Show in Virginia Beach, Virginia by the Strike Fighter Squadron 106, also known as the 'Gladiators'

The pictures follow a stunning video yesterday that showed a US Navy fighter jet approaching the speed of sound while flying by an aircraft carrier.

The incredible video, posted on YouTube by Military, showed an F/A-18C while a group of sailors on the US Navy carrier watched in awe.

Here the vapour cone effect can be seen in even greater detail - and the sonic boom created as it passes the sound barrier can also be heard.

The F/A-18 Hornet is a twin-engine supersonic, all-weather carrier-capable multirole combat jet, designed as both a fighter and attack aircraft.

Originally Designed by McDonnell Douglas (now boeing) and Northrop, the Hornet is also used by the air forces of several other nations.

The U.S. Navy's Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, has used the Hornet since 1986.

The supersonic craft has a top speed of Mach 1.8 (1,190 mph or 1,915 km/h at 40,000 ft or 12,190 m), and in service can carry a wide variety of bombs and missiles, including air-to-air and air-to-ground, supplemented by a 20 mm cannon.

It's primary missions are fighter escort, fleet air defense, Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD), air interdiction, close air support and aerial reconnaissance.

The Hornet saw its first combat action in 1986 during Operation El Dorado Canyon and subsequently participated in 1991 Operation Desert Storm and 2003 Operation Iraqi Freedom.

 

 

 

       

America's first 'super carrier' USS Forrestal where 134 men lost their lives in tragic 1967 fire is sold for ONE CENT and will be turned into scrap after museums refuse to take it

  • The decommissioned USS Forrestal was snapped up for the bargain price by Texas company All Star Metals on Tuesday
  • All 1,067-feet of the ship will be dismantled, scrapped and recycled once it is towed from the Navy's inactive ship facility in Philadelphia to the company's facility in Texas later this year
  • Some 16,000 engineers, draftsmen and builders worked on the ship which cost $217 million - or $2 billion in today's dollars - to build in 1954
  • On July 29, 1967, a stray voltage triggered a rocket to launch from an F-4 Phantom on the flight deck, which sparked fires that killed 134 men

The U.S. Navy has sold the nation's first ever 'supercarrier,' USS Forrestal, for a mere penny.

The decommissioned aircraft carrier, aboard which 134 sailors died in a series of explosions and a massive fire in 1967, was snapped up for the bargain price by Texas company All Star Metals.

All 1,067 foot of the ship will be dismantled, scrapped and recycled once it is towed from the Navy's inactive ship facility in Philadelphia to the company's facility in Texas later this year, the Navy announced.

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Sold: The Navy has sold the nation's first ever 'supercarrier,' USS Forrestal, pictured in 2010, for a mere penny

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All Star Metals: The decommissioned aircraft carrier, pictured in 2010, was snapped up for the bargain price by Texas company All Star Metals

According to Fox News, more than 16,000 engineers, draftsmen and builders worked on the ship which cost an estimated $217 million - or $2 billion in today's dollars - to build. It launched on December 11, 1954. The ship - named after the former Navy secretary and the first U.S. Secretary of Defense, James Forrestal - was in the Gulf of Tonkin for the Vietnam War effort.

On the morning of July 29, 1967, a stray voltage triggered a rocket to launch from an F-4 Phantom on the flight deck and struck an armed A-4 Skyhawk - piloted by a young Lt. Cmdr. John S. McCain III.

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Expensive: The ship, pictured in 1954 when it was launched, cost an estimated $217 million - or $2 billion in today's dollars - to build

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Crowd: A crowd of some 3,000 persons gathered for the launching ceremonies of the USS Forrestal, pictured in 1954

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Big job: More than 16,000 engineers, draftsmen and builders worked on the ship, pictured left and right

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On the high seas: The aircraft carrier USS Forrestal, pictured, was used for jet plane training exercises in the Caribbean in March 1956 before sailing to the Mediterranean to join the U.S. Sixth Fleet

The rocket ruptured the fuel tanks of the plane, sparking a chain reaction of fires and explosions on the deck, which was full of fueled up, parked aircrafts.

The crew fought the blaze on the flight deck for an hour, but other fires continued into the next day.

In the aftermath, 134 men were killed and more than 300 injured. The ship was heavily damaged, and more than 26 aircraft were destroyed and another 30 damaged.

The devastating fire, however, prompted changes to the way the Navy handles damage control and helped improve disaster training.

It took seven months of repairs in the shipyard before the supercarrier was fit to return to sea, where it remained for two more decades.

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Horror day: USS Forrestal suffered heavy damage on July 29, 1967 when fire engulfing the ship exploded bombs and rockets of aircraft, killing 134 men

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Ship: The remarkable supercarrier is pictured left and right in 1956

However, the ship's rich history and nearly four decades of service are not enough to save it.

After it was decommissioned on September 11, 1993 and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register, the Navy tried to donate the historic aircraft carrier for use as a memorial or a museum, but no 'viable applications' were received.

'It's something that the Navy is caught between a rock and a hard place,' historian for the USS Forrestal Association and a survivor of the 1967 incident Ken Killmeyer said, according to Fox News.

'They have to have these vessels no matter how big or small they are, and they use them as you would your car until they’re no longer financially viable. So, they decommission them.'

The USS Forrestal set off under tow on Tuesday morning for its final voyage from Philadelphia to a scrapping facility in Texas.

Pulled by the Foss Marine Towing boat Lauren Foss, the Forrestal was untied from its berth at the former Naval Ship Yard in the pre-dawn darkness and headed down the Delaware River for the start of what is expected to be a 17 to 18-day trip.

The Navy has paid one cent under a contract to have the 60-year-old vessel dismantled by All Star Metals in the Gulf port of Brownsville.

The decommissioned aircraft carrier Ex-USS Forrestal, pictured in 2010, is now on its final voyage to the scrap heap in Texas

The decommissioned aircraft carrier Ex-USS Forrestal, pictured in 2010, is now on its final voyage to the scrap heap in Texas

The aircraft carrier USS Forrestal, pictured in 1956 undergoing jet plane training exercises in the Caribbean. It embarked on its final voyage today from Philadelphia to be turned into scrap in Texas

The aircraft carrier USS Forrestal, pictured in 1956 undergoing jet plane training exercises in the Caribbean. It embarked on its final voyage today from Philadelphia to be turned into scrap in Texas

The USS Forrestal during a shakedown cruise off Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in 1955. The carrier was in service for 38 years before being decommissioned in 1993

The USS Forrestal during a shakedown cruise off Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in 1955. The carrier was in service for 38 years before being decommissioned in 1993

Charred Wreckage on deck of USS Forrestal which suffered heavy damage when fire engulfing the ship exploded bombs and rockets of aircraft off the coast of Vietnam in 1967

Charred Wreckage on deck of USS Forrestal which suffered heavy damage when fire engulfing the ship exploded bombs and rockets of aircraft off the coast of Vietnam in 1967

The Forrestal, the first of the post-World War II supercarriers, was decommissioned September 11, 1993, after more than 38 years of service.

The Navy had offered the carrier for use as a museum or memorial but said none of the applications it received was deemed viable. Under its contract with the Navy, All Start Metals assumes all costs of towing, insuring, and dismantling the vessel with the aim of recovering its costs and making a profit through the sale of the scrap.

The warship remains the Navy’s property until dismantling is complete.

The 1,067-foot ship is perhaps best known for a fire which broke out on board in 1967 while the carrier was on active service in Vietnam.

Charred wreckage on deck of USS Forrestal which suffered heavy fire damage when on active service during the Vietnam War

Charred wreckage on deck of USS Forrestal which suffered heavy fire damage when on active service during the Vietnam War

A rocket from a fighter jet on board misfired and impacted another plane which was incidentally occupied by future Senator John McCain. Some 134 servicemen were killed in the tragic incident and 161 injured.

All Star Metals President Nikhil Shah told Fox today: 'This is the largest ship that we’ve ever dismantled, and the largest ship the U.S. government has ever awarded to be dismantled. It’s a very big job to us.'

Mr Shah would not give a specific cost for towing and dismantling the giant boat but said it was millions of dollars.

The boat was built in 1954 by more than 16,000 workers and named after James Forrestal, the first U.S. Secretary of Defense. It cost $217 million - the equivalent of $2 billion today.

Last-minute construction work is rushed on the U.S. Navy's super-aircraft carrier, the U.S.S. Forrestal in 1954. The U.S. Navy craft will now be sold for scrap

Last-minute construction work is rushed on the U.S. Navy's super-aircraft carrier, the U.S.S. Forrestal in 1954. The U.S. Navy craft will now be sold for scrap.

The US Navy's 'ghost hunter' hits the water: Robo-boats set to track down silent enemy submarines for months at a time

  • Designed to hunt down silent and deadly diesel-electric submarines
  • Robot boats will go to sea for us to three months at a time

The US Navy is set to unleash an army of 'ghost drones' to scour the coasts for enemy submarines.

They hope to end the growing threat of quiet, diesel powered enemy submarines enters American waters undetected.

The robot boats will go to sea for us to three months at a time.

The Anti-submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel, or ACTUV will be able to operate for several months at a time scouring the seas and coastal areas for silent, diesel powered enemy submarines.

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The Anti-submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel, or ACTUV will be able to operate for several months at a time scouring the seas and coastal areas for silent, diesel powered enemy submarines.

THE SILENT ENEMY SUBS

Diesel-electric submarines, with their nearly-noiseless engines, are incredibly difficult to track from afar.

They're also cheap at $200 million to $300 million apiece, making them affordable to the likes of Iran, which claims to have a fleet of 17.

The project began in 2010, when the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, announced that they were building a 132-foot autonomous boat to track quiet, diesel-powered submarines.

The program was dubbed Anti-submarine Warfare Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel, or ACTUV.

In six weeks of tests along a 35-nautical mile stretch of water off of Mississippi earlier this year, testers at engineering company Leidos and DARPA put the ACTUV's systems through 100 different scenarios.

The test boat was able to tail a target boat at 1 kilometer's distance, something military bosses say is a  major step forward.

'Picking up the quiet hum of a battery-powered, diesel-electric submarine in busy coastal waters is 'like trying to identify the sound of a single car engine in the din of a major city,' says Rear Admiral Frank Drennan, commander of the Naval Mine and Anti-Submarine Warfare Command.

Speaking at a National Defense Association Event in Virginia,DARPA program manager Ellison Urban outlined why the Navy needs sub-hunting boat bots.

The test boat was able to tail a target boat at 1 kilometer's distance, something military bosses say is a major step forward.

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The test boat was able to tail a target boat at 1 kilometer's distance, something military bosses say is a major step forward.

'Instead of chasing down these submarines and trying to keep track of them with expensive nuclear powered-submarines, which is the way we do it now, we want to try and build this at significantly reduced cost.

'It will be able to transit by itself across thousands of kilometers of ocean and it can deploy for months at a time.

'It can go out, find a diesel-electric submarine and just ping on it,' said Urban.

Diesel-electric submarines have nearly-noiseless engines, are incredibly difficult to track from afar.

In six weeks of tests along a 35-nautical mile stretch of water off of Mississippi earlier this year, testers at engineering company Leidos and DARPA put the ACTUV's systems through 100 different scenarios.

In six weeks of tests along a 35-nautical mile stretch of water off of Mississippi earlier this year, testers at engineering company Leidos and DARPA put the ACTUV's systems through 100 different scenarios.

Price tags ranging from $200-$300 million put diesel-electric subs within reach of smaller, volatile countries.

Russia has been selling diesel-electric subs to buoy its shipyards, triggering what some are calling an undersea arms race.

Reportedly, Algeria has ordered two, Venezuela is expecting five, and Indonesia will have six subs by 2020. Iran claims to have a fleet of 17 diesel-electric subs.

To spot the threat, Leidos developed an unarmed, unmanned vessel to shadow diesel-electric subs for months across thousands of miles of ocean and chase them out of strategic waters.

'Called the ACTUV, the unmanned boat can be deployed for months and track underwater threats for thousands of miles without human contact.

'It keeps our troops out of harm's way and also minimizes risks to the marine ecosystem by limiting the use of sonar,' the firm says.

It claims diesel-electric submarines are quickly becoming one of the biggest threats to naval operations and a $1.8 trillion commercial shipping industry.

'Detecting and tracking these stealthy subs presents a huge challenge even for the U.S. Navy, the world’s most technologically advanced fleet.'

 

 

The Navy has revealed a radical new laser weapon it says can shoot down missiles, boats and even drones from a warship is already is active service.

The prototype Laser Weapon System was being tested on the USS Ponce in the Persian Gulf, and was so successfully commanders gave the weapon the go-ahead to use it to defend the ship.

Experts say they also found a surprising second use for the system - as a surveillance tool.

 

The laser weapon aboard the USS Ponce, where is was able to shoot boats and drone in exercises

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The laser weapon aboard the USS Ponce, where is was able to shoot boats and drone in exercises

The laser was accurate enough to blow up a test missile being carried on an unmanned platform  during tests of the new weapon aboard the USS Ponce in the Persian Gulf.

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The laser was accurate enough to blow up a test missile being carried on an unmanned platform during tests of the new weapon aboard the USS Ponce in the Persian Gulf.

HOW IT WORKS

The  prototype 30 kW-class solid-state laser (SSL) weapon system developed under the leadership of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), the LaWS integrates six commercial 5.4 kW fibre lasers with a beam combiner originated by the Naval Research Laboratory.

A surface warfare weapons officer aboard USS Ponce who can operate all functions of the laser-and if commanded, fire the laser weapon.

Using a video game-like controller (pictured), that sailor will be able to manage the laser's power to accomplish a range of effects against a threat, from disabling to complete destruction.

Rear Adm. Matthew L. Klunder, chief of naval research, said that during the test sailors began using the system in ways its developers didn't fully anticipate, such as for long-range surveillance.

Sailors were able to identify approaching vessels at ranges 'they have never dreamed of'.

The range of surveillance capabilities is a closely guarded secret.

'We were calling it a Hubble telescope on the water,' Adm. Klunder said.

The prototype, an improved version of the Laser Weapon System (LaWS), was installed on USS Ponce for at-sea testing in the Persian Gulf.

The prototype 30 kW-class solid-state laser (SSL) weapon system was developed under the leadership of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA).

It integrates six commercial 5.4 kW fibre lasers with a beam combiner originated by the Naval Research Laboratory.

Using a video game-like controller, that sailor will be able to manage the laser's power to accomplish a range of effects against a threat, from disabling to complete destruction.

'This is a revolutionary capability,' said Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder said when the tests began.

REL

 

 

It is a weapon that could mean the end of traditional missiles.

Lockheed Martin revealed is has tested the a 30-kilowatt electric fiber laser, the highest power ever fired.

The firm says the weapon could eventually be mounted on jets, tanks and fighter planes - and will more than triple in strength before being used in combat.

Look into the light: The record-breaking power output was achieved by combining many fiber lasers into a single, near-perfect quality beam of light.

Look into the light: The record-breaking power output was achieved by combining many fiber lasers into a single, near-perfect quality beam of light.

HOW IT WORKS

'It’s like an inverse prism,' said John Wojnar, director of business development for Lockheed Martins laser systems business.

'Lasers with slightly different wavelengths go into the combiner and come out as a single beam.'

The result is a fiber laser system capable of producing the 100 kilowatts or more of high quality power needed for a broad range of military “speed-of-light” defensive applications on air, land and sea platforms.

The record-breaking power output was achieved by combining many fiber lasers into a single, near-perfect quality beam of light.

The process, called Spectral Beam Combining, sends beams from multiple fiber laser modules, each with a unique wavelength, into a combiner that forms a single, powerful, high quality beam.

'Lockheed Martin has opened the aperture for high power, electrically driven laser systems suitable for military applications,' said Dr. Ray O. Johnson, senior vice president and chief technology officer of Lockheed Martin.

'Advancements in available laser components, along with the maturity and quality of our innovative beam-combining technology, support our goal of providing lightweight and rugged laser weapon systems for use on military platforms such as aircraft, helicopters, ships and trucks.'

The laser will enetually be mounted on craft such as Lockheed's F-35 jet

The laser will enetually be mounted on craft such as Lockheed's F-35 jet

The successful demonstration is the latest in the firm's bid to create a viable portable laser weapon.

Prior laser weapon demonstrations in the industry showed target acquisition, tracking and destruction.

However, these solutions were limited for tactical military use because their laser inefficiencies drove significant size, power and cooling needs not readily supported by key military ground and airborne platforms.

'The high-energy laser serves as the heart of a laser weapon system,' said Dr. Johnson.

'This 30-kilowatt milestone shows our commitment to producing the high beam quality and high power needed to address a variety of military ‘speed-of-light’ defensive operations.'

The project has received funding from the US Army, which is also working with Boeing on a laser mounted weapon.

 

 

Science fiction fans and military scientists have dreamed of using lasers as weapons for decades, but from next summer it will become a reality.

The U.S. Navy announced on Monday that it will attach a prototype of its Laser Weapons System (LaWS) to USS Ponce and send the amphibious transport docking ship to the Middle East in 2014.

This will be the first time a laser weapon is used in active service. The blast of infrared energy it delivers can disable a small boat or even take down a drone from above as an impressive Navy video shows.

Scroll down for video

Laser revolution: The U.S. Navy announced on Monday that it will send a prototype of its Laser Weapons System to the Middle East in 2014

Laser revolution: The U.S. Navy announced on Monday that it will send a prototype of its Laser Weapons System to the Middle East in 2014

Effective: The laser locks on to its target (left) and with seconds the drone is on fire and heading towards the sea

Effective: The laser locks on to its target (left) and with seconds the drone is on fire and heading towards the sea

Navy researchers told reporters that the laser gun, or a 'directed energy pulse weapon' as the military call it, destroyed its targets 100 percent of the time in testing.

'It operates much like a blowtorch... with an unlimited magazine,' a Navy official told Fox News. The solid-state laser prototype doesn't use up expensive ammunition so is cheap to operate. 'Its weapon round costs about $1 to shoot,' said Rear Admiral Matthew Klunder, a Navy researcher.

However, LaWS costs more to build in the first place - at around $32 million per unit.

Economical: The solid-state laser prototype doesn't use up expensive ammunition so costs $1 per round to operate

Economical: The solid-state laser prototype doesn't use up expensive ammunition so costs $1 per round to operate

Going down: The laser can set fire to unmanned drones or small boats

Going down: The laser can set fire to unmanned drones or small boats

But NBC reported that once this new weapon is operational is may be able to replace a Gatling gun, whose rounds can cost several thousand dollars each.

The video released today shows the potentially devastating form of the new weapon. In the demonstration the laser locks onto an unmanned drone and fires a blinding light.

Within seconds the 'enemy craft' is ablaze. As the flames take hold the drone crashes into the sea.

VIDEO U.S. Navy's new laser gun takes down an unmanned drone

US Navy's new laser weapon to be stationed on a warship in Middle...

The new weapon will be mounted to the fantail of the USS Ponce and sent to the 5th fleet region which includes the Persian Gulf and the Horn of Africa.

The Navy hopes that the laser will be invaluable in combating the small Iranian fast boats and surveillance drones that harass U.S. vessels in the area.

Officials hope that in the next decade the new weapon will be able to shoot down an incoming missile.

Laser

Laser

Hostile territory: The weapon is being sent to the 5th fleet region where the Navy hopes it  will be invaluable in combating the small Iranian fast boats and surveillance drones that harass U.S. vessels in the area

Though there are some concerns with the system. Officers are not yet sure how the laser will function under inclement weather conditions and think that the 5th fleet region will be a huge test for the new weapon.

Officials refused to reveal the range of the laser but hinted it was a 'close in' system. The Navy also said the weapon could also have non-lethal functions, such as sending warning signals to other boats

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

America christens $13billion aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford capable of launching 220 airstrikes a day

  • USS Gerald R. Ford will cost $13Billion when finished
  • Carrier will be equipped to launch 220 airstrikes per day
  • Ship holds 4,000 sailors and marines and is virtually invisible to enemy radar
  • Project faces criticism after becoming beset by delays and cost overruns
  • Navy plans to buy another three carriers, at a cost of $43 billion

The US Navy today christened the USS Gerald Ford, costliest and most deadly aircraft carrier ever built.

The $13billion warship is the first in the Navy's newest generation of aircraft carriers. It was launched in a grand ceremony Saturday from the Newport News, VA., naval yard.

The Ford is expected to stay commissioned for five decades and will enter the fleet in 2016.

 

I christen thee, the USS Gerald Ford: Susan Ford Bales, daughter of former President Gerald R. Ford, right, christens the USS Gerald R. Ford

I christen thee, the USS Gerald Ford: Susan Ford Bales, daughter of former President Gerald R. Ford, right, christens the USS Gerald R. Ford

 

Hooyah!: The USS Gerald Ford has been christened and is ready to move out Hooyah!: The USS Gerald Ford has been christened and is ready to move out

 

 

Hooyah!: The USS Gerald Ford has been christened and is ready to move out

The giant 1,106-foot USS Gerald R. Ford is be able to launch 220 airstrikes per day from its two runways, hold 4,000 sailors and marines while appearing virtually invisible to enemy radar.

'She is truly a technological marvel,' Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert said at the ceremony 'She will carry unmanned aircraft, joint strike fighters, and she will deploy lasers.'

The staggering number of airstrikes, about one every six minutes, is capable because the ship's deck uses electromagnetic force to propel the jets forward, according to WTKR. Pressurized steam is used in older ships.

Electromagnetic force is used to propel roller coasters, the station noted.

The gear used to snag jets as they land will be software controlled, a significant bump from the systems currently used.

Pomp and circumstance: It's not everyday the most expensive aircraft carrier ever built is launched

Pomp and circumstance: It's not everyday the most expensive aircraft carrier ever built is launched

All hands on deck: An honor guard of boy scouts from the local area and Michigan welcome visitors for the christening of the USS Gerald R. Ford

All hands on deck: An honor guard of boy scouts from the local area and Michigan welcome visitors for the christening of the USS Gerald R. Ford

Soon to be set free: The $13billion ship will soon set sail

Soon to be set free: The $13billion ship will soon set sail

President Ford's daughter Susan Bales Ford spoke shortly before smashing a champagne bottle on the ship's bow.

'Dad, their message fills this shipyard,' she said. 'You kept your promise. You healed the nation. You gave the American people a president that was a shining beacon of integrity at the helm.'

'And as demonstrated by Capt. (John) Meier and by the crew and by this mighty carrier, the American people are forever grateful to you. And Dad, I'll always be proud,' she added.

Other speakers honoring Mr Ford included former Vice President Dick Cheney and former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. The Ford - with a new nuclear power plant, electromagnetic catapults and an enhanced 5-acre flight deck - will leave dry dock and head to a pier at Newport News Shipbuilding next week.

The Navy says construction on the ship is about 70 percent complete and will finish up in 2015. It will then undergo a series of sea trials before it is commissioned and becomes operational.

The Navy also plans to buy another three such carriers, at a cost of $43 billion, to complete its fleet.

But the project to build the most advanced aircraft carrier every made has come at a high price, with costs overrunning to the tune of nearly $3billion and major delays.

Beci Brenton, spokesman for Huntington Ingalls Industries, the maker of the ship, told FoxNews.com: 'The structure has been rearranged to accommodate new technology and meet all of the Navy’s operational requirements.

From head to toe: The USS Gerald Ford is decked out in patriotic colors

From head to toe: The USS Gerald Ford is decked out in patriotic colors

Big day: A massive crowd is on-hand to help dedicate the equally gigantic ship

Big day: A massive crowd is on-hand to help dedicate the equally gigantic ship

Finishing touches: Workers tend to a few last minute details before the ceremony begins

Finishing touches: Workers tend to a few last minute details before the ceremony begins

USS Gerald R. Ford construction

The $13billion USS Gerald R. Ford will be one of the most fearsome weapons in the Pentagon's arsenal

Superpower: The new generation of aircraft carriers incorporates a host of top secret technology which is designed to secure dominance of any battlefield

Superpower: The new generation of aircraft carriers incorporates a host of top secret technology which is designed to secure dominance of any battlefield

Deadly: USS Gerald R. Ford will hold 4,000 sailors and marines and is designed to be virtually invisible to enemy radar

Deadly: USS Gerald R. Ford will hold 4,000 sailors and marines and is designed to be virtually invisible to enemy radar

The ship’s structure and exterior are now 100 per cent complete, Brenton said. But internal connections and features inside the ship are still being added.

The ship began construction in Newport News, Virginia, in 2007, but is unlikely to enter sea trials until 2016.

The carrier would be fully capable by February 2019, according to a critical watchdog report.

Delays ranging from between two and a half and four and a half years in testing three of the ship’s most important new advances: its dual band radar, arresting gear and the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System that will catapult jets off the carrier have become serious issues.

Power: The USS Gerald R. Ford is the new generation of aircraft carriers capable of launching 220 airstrikes a day

Power: The USS Gerald R. Ford is the new generation of aircraft carriers capable of launching 220 airstrikes a day

Rising costs: The USS Gerald R. Ford is expected to cost taxpayers more than £13billion when it is finally completed

Rising costs: The USS Gerald R. Ford is expected to cost taxpayers more than £13billion when it is finally completed

US Navy's USS Gerald Ford carrier being built in timelapse film

New generation: The giant 1,106-foot ship is currently under construction at a dry dock in Newport News, Virginia, but will not be commissioned until 2016

New generation: The giant 1,106-foot ship is currently under construction at a dry dock in Newport News, Virginia, but will not be commissioned until 2016

And the spiralling costs come at a time when the Navy is seaching for ways to plug a $14 billion cut in the upcoming fiscal year as a result of the automatic federal budget cuts known as sequestration.

The state-of-the-art carrier has provoked strong criticism from some quarters, including the government's own watchdogs.

In a report earlier this month the Government Accountability Office wrote: 'Key ship systems face reliability shortfalls that the Navy does not expect to resolve until many years after [Ford] commissioning, which will limit the ship’s mission effectiveness during initial deployments and likely increase costs to the government.'

It added: 'The Navy faces technical, design, and construction challenges to completing Gerald R. Ford that have led to significant cost increases.'

National security experts at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the Brookings Institution, have also called into question the value of the aircraft in future conflicts.

'I’m not persuaded they’re worth twice what the old carriers cost,' Michael O’Hanlon, of Brookings, told FoxNews.com.

Christening: Relatives of former U.S. President Gerald Ford salute a model of a new aircraft carrier named the USS Gerald R. Ford during a naming ceremony at the Pentagon in 2007

Christening: Relatives of former U.S. President Gerald Ford salute a model of a new aircraft carrier named the USS Gerald R. Ford during a naming ceremony at the Pentagon in 2007

State-of-the-art: This graphic illustrates the cutting edge technology in the Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier

State-of-the-art: This graphic illustrates the cutting edge technology in the Gerald R. Ford aircraft carrier

 

The laser weapon aboard the USS Ponce, where is was able to shoot boats and drone in exercises

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The laser weapon aboard the USS Ponce, where is was able to shoot boats and drone in exercisesPerfect shot! The moment the laser weapon blows up an unmanned boat during tests in the Persian Gulf

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Perfect shot! The moment the laser weapon blows up an unmanned boat during tests in the Persian Gulf

The weapons was also shown downing a drone with a single blast from its laser

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The weapons was also shown downing a drone with a single blast from its laser

'Our nation's adversaries are pursuing a variety of ways to try and restrict our freedom to operate,' Klunder said.

'Spending about $1 per shot of a directed-energy source that never runs out gives us an alternative to firing costly munitions at inexpensive threats.'

As a result of the test, Navy officials said they planned to deploy the weapon into the Middle East for a year aboard the Ponce, allowing sailors to use the system to track potential threats and defend the ship.

'We have the authorities right now to use it in self-defense,' Klunder said.

'If someone was coming to harm the USS Ponce, we could use this laser system on that threat and we would intend to do so.'

Navy demonstrates powerful new laser gun aboard USS Ponce

The Navy already has demonstrated the effectiveness of lasers in a variety of maritime settings.

In a 2011 demonstration, a laser was used to defeat multiple small boat threats from a destroyer.

In 2012, LaWS downed several unmanned aircraft in tests.

A surface warfare weapons officer aboard USS Ponce who can operate all functions of the laser-and if commanded, fire the laser weapon.

Using a video game-like controller, that sailor will be able to manage the laser's power to accomplish a range of effects against a threat, from disabling to complete destruction.

Just one controller is need, who uses a game controller to direct and fire the laser weapon

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Just one controller is need, who uses a game controller to direct and fire the laser weapon

To show its accuracy, researchers put a test missile on an unmanned craft - and the laser was able to hit it perfectly

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To show its accuracy, researchers put a test missile on an unmanned craft - and the laser was able to hit it perfectly

The deployment on Ponce will prove crucial as the Navy continues its push to provide laser weapons to the fleet at large.

The Navy will decide next year which, if any, of the three industry prototypes are suitable to move forward and begin initial ship installation for further testing.

'We are in the midst of a pivotal transition with a technology that will keep our Sailors and Marines safe and well-defended for years to come,' said Peter Morrison, ONR program manager for SSL-TM.

'We believe the deployment on Ponce and SSL-TM will pave the way for a future acquisition program of record so we can provide this capability across the fleet.'

The U.S. Navy is has declared an experimental laser weapon on its Afloat Forward Staging Base (AFSB) in the Persian Gulf an operational asset and U.S. Central Command has given permission for the commander of the ship to defend itself with the weapon.

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The U.S. Navy is has declared an experimental laser weapon on its Afloat Forward Staging Base (AFSB) in the Persian Gulf an operational asset and U.S. Central Command has given permission for the commander of the ship to defend itself with the weapon.

The USS Ponce, where the radical weapon is being tested by the US Navy

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The USS Ponce, where the radical weapon is being tested by the US Navy

 

 

 

 

The $7billion warship to rule the waves: US Navy's largest destroyer ever built gets ready to set sail

  • USS Zumwalt will have cost $7billion when finally completed
  • Warship features deadly arsenal, radar and stealthy silhouette
  • Fearsome ship can fire rocket-propelled warheads upto 100 miles
  • Engine produces 78 megawatts - enough to power 78,000 homes
  • Ship is designed to maintain US naval supremacy for decades

With its fearsome array of weapons, radar evading silhouette and $7billion price tag, this is one of America's most deadly - and expensive - warships ever.

USS Zumwalt - the largest destroyer ever made - is just days away from leaving the specially constructed dry docks and entering the water.

Equipped with guns capable of firing warheads 100 miles, stealth features, and engine able to generate enough power to run 78,000 homes, America is hoping it with guarantee its naval supremacy for decades to come.

Fearsome: The $7billion first-in-class Zumwalt rises from the dry docks in Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine

Fearsome: The $7billion first-in-class Zumwalt rises from the dry docks in Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine

Hulking: First-in-class USS Zumwalt is the largest U.S. Navy destroyer ever built

Hulking: First-in-class USS Zumwalt is the largest U.S. Navy destroyer ever built

After embarrassing troubles with its latest class of surface warships, the Navy is hoping for a winner from a new destroyer that's ready to go into the water.

So far, construction of the first-in-class Zumwalt, is on time and on budget, something that's a rarity in new defense programs, officials said. The christening of the ship bearing the name of the late Adm. Elmo 'Bud' Zumwalt was canceled a week ago because of the federal government shutdown.

Without fanfare, the big ship will be moved to dry dock and floated in the coming days.

An artist rendering of the USS Zumwalt class destroyer which will be one of the more heavily armed and expensive ships in the U.S Navy

In action: An artist rendering of the USS Zumwalt class destroyer which will be one of the more heavily armed and expensive ships in the U.S Navy

Meanwhile, the public christening ceremony featuring Zumwalt's two daughters will be rescheduled for the spring.

Adm. Zumwalt served in destroyers during World War II and was awarded a Bronze Star for valor at the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

As the nation's youngest chief of naval operations, appointed at age 49 by President Richard Nixon, he fought to end racial discrimination and allowed women to serve on ships for the first time.

Like its namesake, the ship is innovative.

It is so big that Bath Iron Works, a General Dynamics subsidiary, built a 106-foot-tall, $40 million 'Ultra Hall' to accommodate its large hull segments. The ship is 100 feet longer than the existing class of destroyers.

Deadly force: Armed with up to 80 Tomahawk cruise missiles and designed to back up Marines on amphibious missions the USS Zumwalt is so expensive only three will be built

Deadly force: Armed with up to 80 Tomahawk cruise missiles and designed to back up Marines on amphibious missions the USS Zumwalt is so expensive only three will be built

Resembling a 19th century ironclad warship the USS Zumwalt uses a 21st century version of a 'tumblehome' hull

Resembling a 19th century ironclad warship the USS Zumwalt uses a 21st century version of a 'tumblehome' hull

It features an unusual wave-piercing hull, electric drive propulsion, advanced sonar and guided missiles, and a new gun that fires rocket-propelled warheads as far as 100 miles.

Unlike warships with towering radar- and antenna-laden superstructures, the Zumwalt will ride low to the water to minimize its radar signature, making it stealthier than others.

HOW USS ZUMWALT IS EQUIPPED TO DOMINATE THE SEAS FOR DECADES

Displacement: 14,564 long tons (14,798 t)

Length: 600 ft (180 m)

Beam: 80.7 ft (24.6 m)

Draft: 27.6 ft (8.4 m)

Propulsion: 2 Rolls-Royce Marine Trent-30 gas turbines driving Curtiss-Wright generators and emergency diesel generators, 78 MW (105,000 shp); 2 propellers driven by electric motors

Speed: Over 30 kn (56 km/h; 35 mph)

Warpons:

20 × MK 57 VLS modules, with a total of 80 launch cells

RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM), 4 per cell

Tactical Tomahawk, 1 per cell
Vertical Launch Anti-Submarine Rocket (ASROC), 1 per cell

2 × 155 mm/62 caliber Advanced Gun System
920 × 155 mm rounds total; 600 in automated store with Auxiliary store room with up to 320 rounds (non-automatic) as of April 2005
70–100 LRLAP rounds planned as of 2005 of total

• 2 × Mk 110 57 mm gun (CIGS)

Originally envisioned for shore bombardment, the ship's size and power plant that can produce 78 megawatts of electricity — enough to power 78,000 homes — make it a potential platform for futuristic weapons like the electromagnetic rail gun, which uses a magnetic field and electric current to fire a projectile at seven times the speed of sound.

There are so many computers and so much automation that it'll need fewer sailors, operating with a crew of 158, nearly half the complement aboard the current generation of destroyers.

'The concept of the Zumwalt is sort of a bridge between the traditions of the past and the new world of networked warfare and precision guided munitions,' said Loren Thompson, defense analyst at the Lexington Institute.

'It's not so much a radical concept as it is an attempt to pull off a full range of missions with a ship that has one foot in the present and one foot in the future.'

The Navy once envisioned building more than 20 of the ships. But the ship has so many sophisticated features and its cost grew so high that senior Navy officials tried to kill the program. Instead, it was truncated to just three ships, the first being Zumwalt.

The Zumwalt will cost more than $3.5 billion — about three times that of current destroyers — but the program has not been beset by big cost overruns or delays, officials said.

The fact that construction has gone smoothly is a relief for the Navy, which has dealt with embarrassing troubles on its new class of speedy warship, dubbed the 'littoral combat ship.'

Those smaller ships, designed to operate close to shore in littoral waters, have been plagued by escalating costs, production delays and mechanical problems.

What you get for $7 billion dollars: A guide to the USS Zumwalt's unique features

What you get for $7 billion dollars: A guide to the USS Zumwalt's unique features

A model of the Zumwalt Class destroyer to be built by Bath Iron Works and Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding is displayed during a contract signing ceremony at the Pentagon

A model of the Zumwalt Class destroyer to be built by Bath Iron Works and Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding is displayed during a contract signing ceremony at the Pentagon

Mission modules that give them the flexibility to perform roles including anti-submarine warfare and minesweeping are not ready, even though the first ships have been commissioned.

'That ship is a total disaster,' said Norman Polmar, a naval historian, analyst and author.

Against that backdrop, shipbuilders at Bath Iron Works have been toiling away on the Zumwalt, the first entirely new ship built on the banks of the Kennebec River since the original Arleigh Burke was christened more than 20 years ago.

The keel plate for the USS Zumwalt-class destroyer the destroyers will be a new class of multi-mission U.S. Navy surface combatant ship designed to operate as part of a joint maritime fleet

The keel plate for the USS Zumwalt-class destroyer the destroyers will be a new class of multi-mission U.S. Navy surface combatant ship designed to operate as part of a joint maritime fleet

Dan Dowling, president of Local S6, which represents 3,200 shipbuilders, said it's been a challenging project with a new hull design, composite materials and new technology.

'It is a radical departure from what we've known. Whether the Navy is satisfied with the design of the ship is up to them. We can only build what they asked for,' he said, adding, 'I hope they'll be pleased with it. We'd like to build as many of them as we can.'

 

 

 

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