PEOPLE AND PLACES

PEOPLE AND PLACES

Friday, December 15, 2017



FLYING  AIRCRAFT CARRIER POWERED BY Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Engine 

My conceptual design will be without the potruding nose but an upward deck where the planes can be launched in a 30 degree angle at the bow. The wings are fixed and a hybrid Blended Wing Body (BWB).
It will have two twin vertcal stabilizer situated halfway on the wings slanted outward from bow to aft, as the wings will be the whole length of the ship. All engines will be on the other side of the vertcal stabilizer allowing for a clean flight deck and safety for deck personnel.
The flying aircraft carrier with a similar design will carry UAVs controlled by a cutting edge system for the jet-powered Magma concept craft, currently under development in the UK.
The system will use unique blown-air devices to manoeuvre the aircraft, paving the way for future stealthier aircraft designs.

Drones could be about to become even more deadly, thanks to a new technology which promises to make them lighter, faster and harder to detect. The cutting edge new system, which ditches control flaps, has been built for the Magma concept craft (artist's impression)
Drones could be about to become even more deadly, thanks to a new technology which promises to make them lighter, faster and harder to detect. The cutting edge new system, which ditches control flaps, has been built for the Magma concept craft (artist's impression)
BAE systems tests experimental stealth drone design
Advertisement 0:28

TWO NEW UAV TECHNOLOGIES

Two new technologies to be tested using the jet-powered UAV are Wing Circulation Control (WCC) and Fluidic Thrust Vectoring (FTV).
WCC takes air from the aircraft engine and blows it supersonically through the trailing edge of the wing to provide control for the aircraft.
FTV uses blown air to deflect the exhaust, allowing for the direction of the aircraft to be changed. The craft has been developed by BAE Systems, in conjunction with the University of Manchester, who has announced the successful completion of the first phase of flight trials.
The new concept removes the need for conventional moving parts used to move flaps to control the aircraft during flight. 
This could give greater control as well as reduce weight and maintenance costs, allowing for efficient military and civil aircraft in the future.  
In a written statement Professor Clyde Warsop, engineering fellow at BAE Systems, said: 'The technologies we are developing with the University of Manchester will make it possible to design cheaper, higher performance, next generation aircraft.
'Our investment in research and development drives continued technological improvements in our advanced military aircraft.
'This will help to ensure UK aerospace remains at the forefront of the industry and that we retain the right skills to design and build the aircraft of the future.'
Two new technologies to be tested using the jet-powered UAV are Wing Circulation Control (WCC) and Fluidic Thrust Vectoring (FTV).
Two new technologies to be tested using the jet-powered UAV are Wing Circulation Control and Fluidic Thrust Vectoring
Two new technologies to be tested using the jet-powered UAV are Wing Circulation Control and Fluidic Thrust Vectoring
Further flight trials are planned for the coming months, with the ultimate aim of flying the aircraft (artist's impression) without any moving control surfaces or fins 
Further flight trials are planned for the coming months, with the ultimate aim of flying the aircraft (artist's impression) without any moving control surfaces or fins 
WCC takes air from the aircraft engine and blows it supersonically through the trailing edge of the wing to provide control for the aircraft. 
FTV uses blown air to deflect the exhaust, allowing for the direction of the aircraft to be changed.
Further flight trials are planned for the coming months, with the ultimate aim of flying the aircraft without any moving control surfaces or fins.
If successful, the tests will demonstrate the first ever use of such circulation control in flight on a gas turbine aircraft and from a single engine.








Wing-mounted engines supply 80 per cent of the thrust required during take-off and 55 per cent at cruise. The tail-mounted all-electric (boundary-layer ingesting) BLI turbofan (pictured) accounts for the remaining thrust
Wing-mounted engines supply 80 per cent of the thrust required during take-off and 55 per cent at cruise. The tail-mounted all-electric (boundary-layer ingesting) BLI turbofan (pictured) accounts for the remaining thrust
In a conventional aircraft air clings to the body of the plane but with this new design air is transformed into power. To drive the fan (pictured), two smaller engines provide thrust
In a conventional aircraft air clings to the body of the plane but with this new design air is transformed into power. To drive the fan (pictured), two smaller engines provide thrust to develop unique vehicle concepts that will use different fuselage shapes; longer, skinnier and more blended wings. 



Placing the Engine The BWB program is examining a new method for engine installation that promises to increase safety and fuel efficiency. Three advanced “high-bypass ratio” engines will be buried in the trailing edge of the outer section of the BWB wing, allowing the center of the craft free for flight deck use. While conventional aircraft engines only take in “free-stream air,” both the air on and near the surface of the wing will flow through the BWB’s curved inlets and into its engines. Taking in the layer of air on the wing surface reduces drag. While this technology will require validation before becoming a reality, researchers are initiating tests to determine acceptable levels of turbulence in the engine inlet

Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Engine Cycle Analysis for Hybrid-Wing-Body Aircraft







Keywords: soviet fold wing ocean landing floating flying aircraft carrier with landing pad illustration render by concept artist alface killah artstation.com portfolio image samples boac





No comments: