PEOPLE AND PLACES

PEOPLE AND PLACES

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

INVASION AT THE BORDER



INVASION AT THE BORDER

The border between the United States and Mexico stretches 3,169 kilometers (1,969 miles), crossing deserts, rivers, towns, and cities from the Pacific to the Gulf of Mexico. Every year, an estimated 350 million people legally cross the border, with another 500,000 entering into the United States illegally. No single barrier stretches across the entire border, instead, it is lined with a patchwork of steel and concrete fences, infrared cameras, sensors, drones, and nearly 20,000 U.S. Border Patrol agents. As immigrants from Mexico and other Central and South American countries continue to try to find their way into the U.S., Congress is now considering an immigration reform bill called the Border Security, Economic Opportunity and Immigration Modernization Act of 2013. The bill proposes solutions to current border enforcement problems and paths to citizenship for the estimated 11 million existing illegal immigrants in the U.S. Gathered here are images of the US-Mexico border from the past few years.
A section of the controversial US-Mexico border fence expansion project crosses previously pristine desert sands at sunrise on March 14, 2009, between Yuma, Arizona and Calexico, California. The barrier stands 15 feet tall and sits on top of the sand so it can lifted by a machine and repositioned whenever the migrating desert dunes begin to bury it. The almost seven miles of floating fence cost about $6 million per mile to build.(David McNew/Getty Images)

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The US-Mexico border fence with Tijuana, Mexico, on the left, the Pacific Ocean in the background. Photographed on February 17, 2012.(U.S. Customs and Border Protection/Josh Denmark) #
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People hang out on the beach next to the border fence separating Mexico from the U.S. in Tijuana, Mexico, on September 22, 2012.(AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills) #
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A deported migrant climbs the US-Mexico border fence as he prepares for the 6th annual Marcha Migrante, or Migrant March, in Tijuana, on February 2, 2011. The Tijuana to Mexicali pilgrimage was organized by the group Border Angels to raise awareness on immigration issues. (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias) #
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U.S. Border Patrol agent Manny Villalobos (center) patrols with other agents along the international border between Mexico and the United States near San Diego, California, on March 26, 2013. (Reuters/Mike Blake) #
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The US-Mexico border, Mexico on the right and the US on the left, near San Ysidro, California, on February 17, 2012.(U.S. Customs and Border Protection/Josh Denmark) #
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Soldiers prepare to enter a tunnel during a presentation to the media in Tijuana, on November 16, 2011. Police discovered a "major cross-border drug tunnel" running to California from Mexico, and seized 14 tons of marijuana, authorities said. The tunnel linked warehouses in an industrial park south of San Diego and the Mexican border city of Tijuana. (Reuters/Jorge Duenes) #
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Electrical breakers inside a cross-border tunnel located underneath a water purifying plant in Tecate, on December 6, 2012. The tunnel, which was still under construction, was found due to an anonymous tip. It has no exit to the U.S. but a ventilation system, electricity and a water pump. Seven people who were found working on the tunnel when it was discovered were arrested by the authorities, reported local media. (Reuters/Jorge Duenes) #
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Immigrants hide from a border patrol vehicle while waiting for a chance to cross into the United States at the border fence on the outskirts of the Tijuana, on September 19, 2009. (Reuters/Jorge Duenes) #
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A Predator drone operated by U.S. Office of Air and Marine (OAM), taxis towards the tarmac for a surveillance flight near the Mexican border, on March 7, 2013 from Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista, Arizona. The OAM, which is part of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, flies the unmanned - and unarmed - MQ-9 Predator B aircraft an average of 12 hours per day at around 19,000 feet. The drones, piloted from the ground, search for drug smugglers and immigrants crossing illegally from Mexico into the United States.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Clouds of dust kicked up by border patrol vehicles hang in the air along the US-Mexico border fence as agents carry out special operations on July 30, 2009 near the rural town of Campo, some 60 miles east of San Diego. (David McNew/Getty Images) #
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Mauricia Horta Fuentes, 36, stands for a portrait along the fence marking the US-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico, on June 23, 2012. Fuentes, who lived and worked in the United States for years, drove up to a roadblock in Escondido, California, in September, 2008, on her way to pick up kids from school. Since then she has been cut off from her children, and has been forced to create a new life in her old country. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull) #
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The US-Mexico border fence stretches into the countryside near Nogales, Arizona, on March 8, 2013. U.S. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Google maps Street View, in Mexicali, Mexico looking north, toward a field in Calexico, California. (© Google, Inc.) #
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In this image released by the Mexicali Public Safety Department, a man holds up an improvised cannon that was confiscated earlier in the day, February 26, 2013. Police in the border city say the cannon was used to hurl packets of marijuana across a border fence into California. (AP Photo/Mexicali Public Safety Department) #
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Monument 245, viewed from the Mexico side of the border, in Tecate, by a Google Street View van. There are 276 such monuments lining the border, almost all built in the 1890s. (© Google, Inc.) #
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U.S. Border Patrol agent Sal De Leon stands near a section of the US- Mexico border fence while on patrol on April 10, 2013 in La Joya, Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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An undocumented immigrant is detained by the U.S. Border Patrol near the US-Mexico border on April 11, 2013 near Mission, Texas. A group of 16 immigrants from Mexico and El Salvador said they crossed the Rio Grande River from Mexico into Texas during the morning hours before they were caught. The Rio Grande Valley sector of has seen more than a 50 percent increase in illegal immigrant crossings from last year, according to the Border Patrol. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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U.S. Border Patrol ranch liaison John "Cody" Jackson (right) rides with cattle rancher Dan Bell on Bell's ZZ Cattle Ranch at the US-Mexico border, on March 8, 2013 in Nogales, Arizona. Jackson meets regularly with local ranchers to coordinate the agency's efforts on border issues, including drug smuggling and illegal immigration from Mexico. Bell, a third generation rancher, grazes cattle on nearly ten miles of border property. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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In this photo provided by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, a silver Jeep Cherokee that suspected smugglers were attempting to drive over the U.S.-Mexico border fence is stuck at the top of a makeshift ramp, on October 31, 2012 near Yuma, Arizona. U.S. Border Patrol agents from the Yuma Station seized both the ramps and the vehicle, which stalled at the top of the ramp after it became high centered. The fence is approximately 14 feet high where the would-be smugglers attempted to drive across the border. The two suspects fled into Mexico when the agents arrived at the scene. (AP Photo/U.S. Customs and Border Protection) #
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Property owner Bill Odle carries a gun and pocket knife as he discusses his perspective on Border Patrol near his home adjacent to the Arizona-Mexico border near Naco, Arizona, on March 29, 2013. Despite additional fencing and agents, Odle says their Border Patrol's presence on the line is only intermittent. (Reuters/Samantha Sais) #
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Google Street View of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona, seen from just over the border, in the northern Mexican state of Sonora. (© Google, Inc.) #
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Residents of Naco, Arizona join residents of Naco, Mexico for a volleyball match during the fourth "Fiesta Bi-Nacional" at the fence that separates the U.S. (left) and Mexico (right), on April 14, 2007. (Reuters/Jeff Topping) #
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In numerous places, fences and roads marking the US-Mexico border simply end, only to start again miles away. This aerial view of such a road ends on a hillside on the border in southeast Arizona. (© Google, Inc.) #
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Flor Gonzales, 19, from Chiapas, Mexico spends a night at the San Juan Bosco shelter for undocumented immigrants on March 9, 2013 in Nogales, Mexico. She said she was caught by the U.S. Border Patrol while trying for the first time to cross with a group into Arizona and was deported. The Juan Bosco shelter, located in Nogales, Mexico close to the U.S. border, allows immigrants to stay for up to three nights, either after they have been deported from the U.S. or before they attempt to cross the border into Arizona.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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The border wall, illuminated at night in Nogales, Arizona, on July 6, 2012. (Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images) #
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U.S. border cops in western Arizona seized this off-road go-kart and trailer packed with marijuana, in an attempt by Mexican smugglers to beat beefed up border security. The Border Patrol's Yuma sector said agents and officers from the Cocopah Tribal Police Department spotted the single-seater go-kart hauling a trailer through the desert near Yuma, Arizona, and gave chase. The driver abandoned the homemade vehicle, which was spray painted a desert beige, fitted with knobbly off-road tires, and towing a trailer packed with 217 pounds of marijuana, about 100 yards from the border, and fled back to Mexico. (Reuters/U.S. Customs and Border Protection) #
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Two men illegally cross the border fence separating Nogales, Arizona, and Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, on July 28, 2010.(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) #
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David Walker, a Southern Arizona rancher, stands at the border wall with Mexico on August 15, 2010 in Hereford, Arizona, Walker was attending the United Border Coalition Tea Party Rally in support of Arizona's immigration law, SB1070 with conservative tea party activists along a remote stretch of the Arizona-Mexico border about 70 miles (113 km) west of Nogales. (AP Photo/Matt York) #
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The United States/Mexico border fence, in Nogales, Arizona, on November 10, 2010. A town of about 20,000 people, it lies just north of the city of Nogales, Mexico, which has a population estimated at nearly ten times that number. (Reuters/Eric Thayer) #
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Aerial view of a desert area south of Yuma, Arizona (left), and, across the border fence, the streets of San Luis Rio Colorado, Sonora, Mexico. (© Google, Inc.) #
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The zig-zag Amistad Reservoir, part of the Rio Grande, acts as the international border between Mexico (bottom), and The U.S. (top).(© Google, Inc.) #
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In Union Hidalgo, southern Mexico, migrants ride on top of a northbound train, heading toward the US-Mexico border, on April 29, 2013. Migrants crossing Mexico to get to the U.S. have increasingly become targets of criminal gangs who kidnap them to obtain ransom money.(AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo) #
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Suspected drug smugglers flee across the Rio Grande River into Mexico on April 11, 2013 in Mission, Texas. Their marijuana smuggling atttempt was broken up by U.S. Border Patrol agents with helicopter support from the Office of Air and Marine.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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An aerial view of the Santa Fe bridge that links the Mexican city of Ciudad Juarez, bottom, with the U.S. city of El Paso, Texas, on February 16, 2010. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini) #
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A woman, who declined to give her name, is hugged by her husband as they chat between the border fence separating Nogales, Arizona, and Nogales, Mexico, on July 28, 2010. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) #
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A U.S. Border Patrol agent searches in dense brush for undocumented immigrants who had crossed from Mexico into the United States on April 11, 2013 in Penitas, Texas. In the last month the Border Patrol's Rio Grande Valley sector has seen a spike in the number of immigrants crossing the river from Mexico into Texas. With more apprehensions, they have struggled to deal with overcrowding while undocumented immigrants are processed for deportation. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A pickup load of marijuana sits after being seized near the US-Mexico Border on April 11, 2013 in Mission, Texas. U.S. Border Patrol agents broke up a marijuana smuggling shipment from Mexico into Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A suspected drug trafficker stands, caught in the weeds on the bank of the Rio Grande River at the US-Mexico Border, on April 11, 2013 in Mission, Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A U.S. border patrol vehicle, seen from the Mexican side of the border in a long-exposure photograph, while driving near Otay Mountain on the outskirts of San Diego, California, on July 1, 2010. (Reuters/Jorge Duenes)
Photographer Eric Thayer traveled to Brooks County, Texas and Reynosa, Mexico to investigate the rising rates of immigrant deaths along the border there, spending time at a migrant’s hostel in Mexico and with U.S. Border Patrol in Brooks County. In 2012, sheriff’s deputies in Brooks County found 129 bodies, around double the amount from the year before and six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants, after spending several weeks traveling through Mexico and past the Rio Grande, spend a few days in a “stash house”, such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead.
A Deadly Border
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People are taken into custody by the U.S. Border Patrol near Falfurrias, Texas March 29, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012 sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 29, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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People are taken into custody by the U.S. Border Patrol near Falfurrias, Texas March 29, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 29, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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The border fence is seen in Mission, Texas March 28, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 28, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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The border fence is seen in Hidalgo, Texas March 28, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 28, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A sign is seen on the gate of a ranch in Falfurrias, Texas April 2, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 2, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A group of illegal immigrants, who handed themselves in to U.S. Border Patrol, sit in a restaurant in Encino, Texas March 29, 2013. Members of the group said their guide left them in the desert and never returned. After being lost for days and running out of food and water they handed themselves in. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 29, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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U.S. Border Patrol agent Daniel Tirado from the Rio Grande Valley Sector looks out at the Rio Grande river in Hidalgo, Texas March 28, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 28, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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The unidentified grave of a person whose remains were found in the desert is seen in Falfurrias, Texas April 1, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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The unidentified graves of people whose remains were found in the desert are seen in Falfurrias, Texas April 1, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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The Los Ebanos Ferry Crossing checkpoint is seen along the Rio Grande river in Los Ebanos, Texas March 28, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 28, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A U.S. Border Patrol agent from the Rio Grande Valley Sector searches for a group of illegal immigrants who crossed the Rio Grande River in Mission, Texas March 28, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 28, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A boy runs on the shore at the boundary between the United States and Mexico, where the Rio Grande river meets the Gulf of Mexico in Brownsville, Texas March 31, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 31, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A U.S. Border Patrol agent looks out at the desert near Falfurrias, Texas March 29, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 29, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A sign is seen at the Falfurrias U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint near Falfurrias, Texas March 29, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 29, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A U.S. Border Patrol agent walks past a rescue beacon near Falfurrias, Texas March 29, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 29, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A U.S. Border Patrol agent checks cars at the Falfurrias checkpoint, near Falfurrias, Texas March 29, 2013. Located about 70 miles (113 km) north of the border, 5,000-7,000 cars pass through the checkpoint on a normal day, and 12,000 on holidays. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 29, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A car filled with bales of marijuana is seen at a police station in La Grulla, Texas March 28, 2013. When police tried to pull the car over, the driver led officers on a high speed pursuit, driving the car into the Rio Grande river. The driver abandoned the vehicle and fled back across the river and into Mexico. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Border Patrol agents and local and state law enforcement are inundated with not only an increase in the numbers of illegal immigrants, but drug smugglers as well. Picture taken March 28, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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Rancher Gabriel Cantu poses for a photograph on his property near Falfurrias, Texas April 2, 2013. Cantu said that he has noticed an increase in the number of people crossing his property recently. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 2, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A street sign is seen in the Southmost neighborhood in Brownsville, Texas March 30, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken March 30, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A man talks on a pay phone at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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People sit on a couch at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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Beds are seen in a sleeping area at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A man washes his clothes at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A man is reflected in a mirror at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa, Mexico April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A man stands in a sleeping area at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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Shoes dry at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A man receives a haircut at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A man sews his jeans at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A man sits on a couch at Casa del Migrante in Reynosa April 1, 2013. Casa del Migrante provides housing, food, clothing and medical care to people who are planning to cross the border, and to those who have been deported from the United States. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 1, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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A memorial is seen in the desert near Falfurrias, Texas April 2, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead. Picture taken April 2, 2013. REUTERS/Eric Thayer #
A Deadly Border
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U.S. Border Patrol agents search for a group of 50 illegal immigrants, following a report from a rancher, near Falfurrias, Texas March 29, 2013. Brooks County has become an epicentre for illegal immigrant deaths in Texas. In 2012, sheriff's deputies found 129 bodies there, six times the number recorded in 2010. Most of those who died succumbed to the punishing heat and rough terrain that comprise the ranch lands of south Texas. Many migrants spend a few days in a "stash house", such as the Casa del Migrante, in Reynosa, Mexico, and many are ignorant of the treacherous journey ahead.












































































































Map that shows how U.S. immigration has been revolutionized in 60 years: How repeal of 'racist' law caused Mexico to outstrip Germany as main source of immigrants

  • A new series of maps chart the changing face of American immigration since 1850
  • In 1910, 18 percent of all immigrants - 2.5 million people - in the United States were German-born
  • Germans remained the dominant immigrant group until the 1960s, when the law was changed and Mexicans became the largest group
  • The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 abolished the 'racist' national origins quota system which heavily favored northern European migrants
  • The quota system had been passed in 1924, when Congress had decided future immigration should be based on who was in the country as of 1890
  • The 1965 law and the ability to bring over family members has enabled immigrants from all over the world to establish communities in the U.S.View comments
The United States is a nation built on wave upon wave of immigrants and in a new series of maps the Pew Research Center has charted the changing face of American immigration since 1850.
The change over the past 100 years or so – reflected in maps representing 1910 and 2010 – shows a dramatic contrast between a time when the majority of immigrants were German and more recent times when Mexicans have become the dominant immigrant group.
Many Americans can trace their roots to that wave of European migrants from 1890-1919, when Germany dominated as the country sending the most immigrants, followed by Russia, the United Kingdom and Italy.
In 1910, 18% of all immigrants - or 2.5 million - in the United States were German-born, reports the Pew Research Center.
Germans made up the biggest immigrant group in 17 states and the District of Columbia, while Mexico - which shares a nearly 2,000-mile border with the U.S. - accounted for the most immigrants in the border states of Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.
Germany remained the dominant immigrant group until 1965 due to a quota system, known as the National Origins Formula, that the country used to control immigration.
The law setting this quota system had been passed in 1924, when Congress keen to preserve an ‘ethnic balance’ had decided that future immigration should be based on who was in the country as of 1890. 
This map shows the dominant immigrant group in each state in 1910 and show that Germans were the latest group, making up 18% of all immigrants
This map shows the dominant immigrant group in each state in 1910 and show that Germans were the latest group, making up 18% of all immigrants
This map shows the dominant immigrant group in each state in 1910 and show that Germans were the latest group, making up 18% of all immigrants
This 2010 map shows a significant change from 100 years earlier and now Mexicans are the dominant immigrant group following the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965   
The law, passed by a congress largely of northern European decent, excluded Asians and Africans and preferred northern and western Europeans over southern and eastern ones.
As the GIF in this story shows, Germans continuing to dominate immigration in 1910, 1930, and 1960 because the 1924 law had basically froze the demographics of the immigrant population in place until 1965.
Then at the height of the civil rights movement of the 1960s the law was seen as an embarrassment by, among others, President John F. Kennedy, who called the then-quota-system 'nearly intolerable'. 
Rice University sociologist Stephen Klineberg called it ‘unbelievable in its clarity of racism,’ reports Vox.
After Kennedy's assassination, President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill to open the nation's borders at the foot of the Statue of Liberty as a symbolic gesture.
After Kennedy's assassination, President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill to open the nation's borders at the foot of the Statue of Liberty as a symbolic gesture
After Kennedy's assassination, President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill to open the nation's borders at the foot of the Statue of Liberty as a symbolic gesture
The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, also known as the Hart–Celler Act, abolished the national origins quota system and replaced it with a preference system that focused on immigrants' skills and family relationships with citizens or U.S. residents. 
Numerical restrictions on visas were set at 170,000 per year, with a per-country-of-origin quota, not including immediate relatives of U.S. citizens, nor 'special immigrants'. The system remain to this day.
In order to convince the American people of the legislation's merits, its proponents assured that passage would not influence America's culture significantly. 
President Johnson called the bill 'not a revolutionary bill. It does not affect the lives of millions', while Secretary of State Dean Rusk estimated only a few thousand Indian immigrants over the next five years.
Senator Ted Kennedy also hastened to reassure the population that the demographic mix would not be affected, but as the post-1965 maps show these assertions proved inaccurate.
The new law enabled greater access to immigrants from Asia and Latin America - especially Mexico.
In particular, the ability to bring over family members has enabled immigrants from every region of the world to establish immigration communities in the U.S.
This diagram shows that there were less immigrants to the U.S. in 2010, compared to 1910 and that since 1965 50 percent of all immigrants have been from Latin America
This diagram shows that there were less immigrants to the U.S. in 2010, compared to 1910 and that since 1965 50 percent of all immigrants have been from Latin America
















This is the moment a makeshift encampment, set up by immigrants desperate for a new life in the US, is dramatically raided by border police.
Sleeping on pieces of cardboard, more than 80 immigrants were hiding in camouflaged tents and huts in a suburban part of Texas near its border with Mexico.
Surviving on little food and water for at least a week, the men had found an undeveloped patch of scrub near an abandoned tennis club at McAllen.
But their bid to enter the country came to an end when Border Patrol officers swooped. A short time later, Border Patrol arrested 132 immigrants found in two buildings on a property in Alton, about eight miles west of McAllen.
Guides are believed to lead the immigrants across the Rio Grande in smaller groups and then mass them in so-called stash houses on the Texas side of the border until their transportation can be arranged for the next leg of their journey.
One of those arrested, Alfredo Espinoza Rivera, said he had left El Salvador about six weeks earlier, paying $7,000 to a smuggler. The 37-year-old said he was trying to reach his father, a U.S. citizen, in Los Angeles.
The Border Patrol made more than 154,000 arrests on the section of the US-Mexico border in southernTexas last year, more than anywhere else on the Southwest border. The majority of the immigrants come from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala.
Immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally sit in a group after US Border Patrol agents detained at least 80 people who had been living in a makeshift encampment in suburban McAllen, Texas. A patrol officer stands guard while those arrested are asked to sit on the ground
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Immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally sit in a group after US Border Patrol agents detained at least 80 people who had been living in a makeshift encampment in suburban McAllen, Texas. A patrol officer stands guard while those arrested are asked to sit on the ground
With their hands resting on the shoulders of the person in front, immigrants suspected of being in the US illegally are transported to a bus on Thursday. Moments earlier, their makeshift camp, hidden in a patch of suburban scrubland in McAllen, texas, had been raided by border patrol officers
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With their hands resting on the shoulders of the person in front, immigrants suspected of being in the US illegally are transported to a bus on Thursday. Moments earlier, their makeshift camp, hidden in a patch of suburban scrubland in McAllen, texas, had been raided by border patrol officers
An immigrant suspected of being in the country illegally emerges from the hidden encampment in Texas and is escorted away. Authorities said there had been a camp at the site in McAllen for at least a week with little food or water
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An immigrant suspected of being in the country illegally emerges from the hidden encampment in Texas and is escorted away. Authorities said there had been a camp at the site in McAllen for at least a week with little food or water
With their hands clasped together behind their heads, a row of immigrants are marched out of their camp, watched by two Border Patrol officers. Some of the men said they survived on little food or water for a week, staying in huts and tents hidden by trees and cacti
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With their hands clasped together behind their heads, a row of immigrants are marched out of their camp, watched by two Border Patrol officers. Some of the men said they survived on little food or water for a week, staying in huts and tents hidden by trees and cacti
With bags and clothes left abandoned on the ground, this is the site of the makeshift encampment set up by dozens of immigrants in McAllen, Texas. Cardboard was used to sleep on while in some cases, shelter came from the branches of trees
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With bags and clothes left abandoned on the ground, this is the site of the makeshift encampment set up by dozens of immigrants in McAllen, Texas. Cardboard was used to sleep on while in some cases, shelter came from the branches of trees
A young man, with a glum look on his face, is handcuffed by a Border Patrol officer as he is shown where to go next. He was arrested on suspected of entering the US illegally along with scores of others along the Texas border
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A young man, with a glum look on his face, is handcuffed by a Border Patrol officer as he is shown where to go next. He was arrested on suspected of entering the US illegally along with scores of others along the Texas border
Sitting on the ground after being arrested, some of the many immigrants found camping along the Texas border are guarded by green-uniformed Border Patrol officers. In total more than 200 immigrants were arrested on Thursday
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Sitting on the ground after being arrested, some of the many immigrants found camping along the Texas border are guarded by green-uniformed Border Patrol officers. In total more than 200 immigrants were arrested on Thursday
Everado Sanchez from Honduras, pictured, an immigrant suspected of being in the US illegally, waits with others arrested on the Texas border. Agents spent about three hours rounding up the immigrants during the raid
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Everado Sanchez from Honduras, pictured, an immigrant suspected of being in the US illegally, waits with others arrested on the Texas border. Agents spent about three hours rounding up the immigrants during the raid
Looking down towards the ground and clasping the shoulders of the person in front of them, lines of male and female immigrants suspected of being in the US illegally are led away from their makeshift camp
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Looking down towards the ground and clasping the shoulders of the person in front of them, lines of male and female immigrants suspected of being in the US illegally are led away from their makeshift camp
Most of the 200 immigrants arrested during the raids on Thursday are believed to be from Central America including Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. In this picture, men ranging in age group, sit together in the long grass near the camp they chad called home for a week. One man said he had been surviving on 'one burrito a day'
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Most of the 200 immigrants arrested during the raids on Thursday are believed to be from Central America including Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala. In this picture, men ranging in age group, sit together in the long grass near the camp they chad called home for a week. One man said he had been surviving on 'one burrito a day'
With a Cross around his neck, the young man pictured left in a dark hooded top, leads a line of fellow detainees. A Border Patrol agent stands guard while scores of people arrested during their raid are led away
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With a Cross around his neck, the young man pictured left in a dark hooded top, leads a line of fellow detainees. A Border Patrol agent stands guard while scores of people arrested during their raid are led away
Through the long grass growing at the scrub land they were using for accommodation, these men and women are are just some of the many people arrested each year trying to gain a new life in the US. Last year 154,000 arrests were made on the section of the US-Mexico border in southern Texas, more than anywhere else on the Southwest border
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Through the long grass growing at the scrub land they were using for accommodation, these men and women are are just some of the many people arrested each year trying to gain a new life in the US. Last year 154,000 arrests were made on the section of the US-Mexico border in southern Texas, more than anywhere else on the Southwest border
Guides typically lead the immigrants across the Rio Grande in smaller groups and then mass them in so-called stash houses on the Texas side of the border until their transportation can be arranged for the next leg of their journey
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Guides typically lead the immigrants across the Rio Grande in smaller groups and then mass them in so-called stash houses on the Texas side of the border until their transportation can be arranged for the next leg of their journey
A young man is led away by border patrol following the raid. Another man, Alfredo Espinoza Rivera, who was arrested at the camp, said he had left El Salvador about six weeks earlier, paying $7,000 to a smuggler. The 37-year-old said he was trying to reach his father, a US citizen, in Los Angeles. 'I'm scared to go back to my country,' he said. "There's a lot of crime and it's hard to live there."
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A young man is led away by border patrol following the raid. Another man, Alfredo Espinoza Rivera, who was arrested at the camp, said he had left El Salvador about six weeks earlier, paying $7,000 to a smuggler. The 37-year-old said he was trying to reach his father, a US citizen, in Los Angeles. 'I'm scared to go back to my country,' he said. "There's a lot of crime and it's hard to live there."



































An Immigrant's Journey

 
Getty Images photographer John Moore has spent years covering stories about immigration between Mexico and the United States -- border enforcement, drug smuggling, undocumented workers, and more. Earlier this year, he traveled south to the Mexico-Guatemala border, where Central American immigrants cross the Suchiate River, beginning their long and perilous journey north through Mexico. He traveled with some of the thousands of immigrants who ride atop freight trains, known as "la bestia," or the Beast, toward the U.S. border. Riders on the Beast risk a great deal -- robbery and assault by gangs who control the train tops, or the loss of life or limb in a fall. Only a fraction of the immigrants who start the journey in Central America will traverse Mexico completely unscathed -- and all this before illegally entering the United States and facing the considerable U.S. border security apparatus designed to track, detain, and deport them. Moore has captured images not only of their difficult journey, but of the faces of these travelers, telling their stories through compelling portraits taken in shelters and jails along the way.
People cross into Mexico, rafting across the Suchiate River from Guatemala, on August 2, 2013 in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas, Mexico. Thousands of undocumented Central Americans pass illegally through Mexico, many of them immigrants on the first leg of their long and perilous journey north to the United States. (John Moore/Getty Images)
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The mountains of Guatemala, viewed from the Mexican side of the border on August 1, 2013 in Talisman, Mexico.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A group of undocumented Guatemalans is ferried across the Suchiate River into Mexico on August 1, 2013 in Talisman, Mexico. They pass directly under a bridge with a Mexican immigration checkpoint. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Undocumented people disembark after crossing into Mexico from Guatemala at the Suchiate River on August 1, 2013 in Talisman, Mexico.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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An indigenous family walks from Guatemala into Talisman, Mexico, after illegally crossing the border at the Suchiate River, on August 1, 2013.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Lightning flashes across the sky as a freight train known as "la bestia," or the beast, prepares to depart Arriaga, Mexico, on August 3, 2013. Thousands of migrants ride atop the trains during their journey through Mexico to the U.S. border. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A Nicaraguan immigrant wears a plastic bag during a thunderstorm before climbing atop a freight train headed north in Arriaga, early on August 4, 2013. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Central American migrants climb atop a freight train headed north early on August 4, 2013 in Arriaga. Many of the immigrants making this journey are robbed or assaulted by gangs who control the train tops, while others fall asleep and tumble down, losing limbs or perishing under the wheels of the trains. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A train crew loads sand into an engine to sprinkle on rain-slick tracks while headed north from Arriaga, on August 4, 2013.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Lightning flashes as Central American migrants stand atop a freight train headed north from in Arriaga, on August 4, 2013.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Undocumented Guatemalan immigrant Elvira Lopez, 22, stands on crutches at the Jesus el Buen Pastor shelter in Tapachula, Mexico, on July 31, 2013. She has been convalescing at the shelter for six months after falling under the wheels of a freight train and losing her right leg while en route to the United States. The shelter, which relies entirely on private donations, has helped countless immigrants recover from their wounds while helping arrange for prosthetics. Lopez said she fell asleep 5 days into her journey from Guatemala and was knocked off the train by a tree branch. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Guatemalan immigrant Jorge Enrique, 33, spends an evening at the Hermanos en el Camino immigrant shelter on August 5, 2013 in Ixtepec, Mexico. He said he planned to ride a freight train later that night to continue his journey north to eventually cross into the United States on his way to Tampa, where he had previously worked as a house painter. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Salvadorian immigrant Consuelo Miscuita, 42, and her daughter Wendy, 15, spend another night at the Hermanos en el Camino immigrant shelter on August 5, 2013 in Ixtepec, Mexico. Consuelo said before arriving to the shelter they were robbed of all their money by Mexican federal police. They have been staying at the Hermanos shelter for four months while awaiting Mexican immigration documents to allow them to safely travel to the U.S. border by bus. Once there, they plan to meet up with Wendy's father, who is currently working in the northern state of Sonora, and then try to illegally cross together into the United States. The women are trying to avoid riding the freight trains, known as "la bestia," or the beast, as thousands of other Central Americans do on their perilous journey north through Mexico. Some of the immigrants are robbed, assaulted or, especially in the case of women, raped by gangs who control the train tops. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Honduran immigrant Jorge Vargas Aguilar, 18, spends a day at the Hermanos en el Camino immigrant shelter in Ixtepec, on August 5, 2013. He said he planned to ride a freight train north later that night to continue his journey to the U.S. border and eventually to San Francisco to find whatever work he can. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Honduran transgender immigrant Daniela, 20, at the Hermanos en el Camino immigrant shelter in Ixtepec, on August 5, 2013. She has been staying at the shelter for more than a month while Mexican immigration authorities process documents to allow her to travel to the U.S. border via bus, a much safer alternative than riding the freight trains north. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Honduran immigrant Melvin, 16, in the Hermanos en el Camino immigrant shelter in Ixtepec, on August 5, 2013. He said he planned to ride a freight train north later that night to continue his journey to the U.S. border and eventually to San Francisco to find whatever work he can.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Honduran immigrant Ruben, 43, spends a day at the Hermanos en el Camino immigrant shelter on August 5, 2013 in Ixtepec, Mexico. He had previously worked in Orlando, Florida as a construction worker. He said that when he had saved enough money five years ago, he returned voluntarily to Honduras and was assaulted and robbed of all his savings, also suffering a serious injury to his right eye. Now, again journeying to the U.S, he said he planned to ride a freight train north to the border and eventually return to Orlando. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Immigrants listen as Catholic Father Alejandro Solalinde Guerra warns them of the dangers in their journey to the United States, while at the Hermanos en el Camino (Brothers on the Road) shelter on August 4, 2013 in Ixtepec, Mexico. The shelter, founded by Solalinde in 2007, houses and feeds immigrants, mostly from Central America, during a stop on their train route through Mexico towards the U.S. border.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Central American immigrants check a map of Mexico before boarding a freight train headed north on August 3, 2013 from Arriaga, Mexico.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Immigrants arrive for a rest stop after a 15 hour ride atop a freight train headed north in Ixtepec, Mexico, on August 4, 2013.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Central American immigrants atop a freight train stop briefly in Ixtepec, on August 6, 2013. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Central American immigrants arrive on top of a freight train to the Hermanos en el Camino immigrant shelter in Ixtepec, on August 6, 2013. The sign outside reads "Welcome Migrants." (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Central American immigrants ride north on top of a freight train near Juchitlan, Mexico, on August 6, 2013. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A Central American immigrant rides atop a freight train on August 6, 2013 through Juchitlan, Mexico. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Immigrants duck beneath tree branches while riding on top of a freight train near Juchitlan, on August 6, 2013.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Immigrants fall asleep atop a freight train near Juchitlan, on August 6, 2013. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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The international port of entry stretches from the U.S. (right), into Mexico on May 21, 2013 in Hidalgo, Texas. The Rio Grande Valley area is an important international commercial zone but has also become the busiest sector for illegal immigration and a key drug smuggling route on the entire U.S.-Mexico border. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A suspected drug smuggling scout paddles his raft back across the Rio Grande into Mexico from the U.S. side of the border on May 21, 2013 near Hidalgo, Texas. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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An anthropology student marks the spot where human bones of a suspected undocumented immigrant were found by the U.S. Border Patrol on a ranch on May 22, 2013 in Falfurrias, Brooks County, Texas. In Brooks County alone, at least 129 immigrants perished in 2012, most of dehydration while making the long crossing from Mexico. Teams from Baylor University and the University of Indianapolis are exhuming the bodies of more than 50 immigrants who died, mostly from heat exhaustion, while crossing illegally from Mexico into the United States. The bodies will be examined and cross checked with DNA sent from Mexico and Central American countries, with the goal of reuniting the remains with families. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A U.S. Border Patrol agent detains undocumented immigrants who had crossed from Mexico into the United States on April 11, 2013 in Mission, Texas. In the last month the Border Patrol's Rio Grande Valley sector has seen a spike in the number of immigrants crossing the river from Mexico into Texas. With more apprehensions, they have struggled to deal with overcrowding while undocumented immigrants are processed for deportation. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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A U.S. Border Patrol agent handcuffs an undocumented immigrant near the U.S.-Mexico border near Mission, Texas, on April 11, 2013. A group of 16 immigrants from Mexico and El Salvador said they crossed the Rio Grande River from Mexico into Texas during the morning hours before they were caught. (John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Glegario Ramiriz, 44, poses for a portrait as he serves time in Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio's tent jail in Phoenix, Arizona, on March 11, 2013. Ramirez was arrested in Phoenix in November for drug possession. He said he had been living with his family in Phoenix and previously Los Angeles for a total of 34 years. As an undocumented immigrant with a criminal record, he may likely be deported to Mexico after his serving his sentence. President Obama's administration deported a record 1.5 million people during his first term of office. In 2012, 55 percent of deportees had criminal convictions for drug offenses or driving under the influence, according to U.S. immigration officials.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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An immigrant inmate exercises while another sits on his bunk at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. The striped uniforms and pink undergarments are standard issue at the facility, despite an ongoing court challenge. The tent jail, run by Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, houses undocumented immigrants who are serving up to one year after being convicted of crime in the county. Although many of immigrants have lived in the U.S for years, often with families, most will be deported to Mexico after serving their sentences.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Jose Rosales, 17, from Guatemala spends a night at the San Juan Bosco shelter for immigrants in Nogales, Mexico, on March 9, 2013. Rosales said that he had lived as an undocumented immigrant in Los Angeles for two years before he was deported. He planned to try and cross into Arizona with a "coyote" or human smuggler in the upcoming days. The Juan Bosco shelter, located in Nogales, Mexico close to the U.S. border, allows immigrants to stay for up to three nights, either after they have been deported from the U.S. or before they try to cross into Arizona.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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An immigrant from Guanajuato, Mexico spends a night at the San Juan Bosco shelter in Nogales, Mexico, on March 9, 2013. The man, 40, who preferred to not give his name, said he had been living in California for 14 years, working as a farm laborer. He said he was arrested by police after an argument with his spouse and then turned over to immigration authorities, who deported him a month later.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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Jorge Rodriguez, 62, from Guatemala, spends a night at the San Juan Bosco shelter for undocumented immigrants in Nogales, Mexico, on March 9, 2013. Rodriguez said he worked in the United States for 8 months before he was detained by immigration authorities and deported.(John Moore/Getty Images) #
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American citizen Lace Rodriguez and her husband Javier Guerrero from Mexico, embrace with their son Javier Jr., in Nogales, Mexico, on March 10, 2013. The family lived together in Phoenix, Arizona before Guerrero, an undocumented worker from Mexico, was detained by the Border Patrol after being stopped for speeding and drug possession, held for three months by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and then deported March 4 to Nogales, Mexico. Guerrero had lived in the United States for 17 years. He and Rodriguez, a medical student, have two children, and she is nine months pregnant with a third. The splitting up of families has become a major issue as the U.S. works towards immigration reform. (John Moore/Getty Images)




































1 comment:

US Waivers Pardon said...

Beautiful pictures and good information about crossing the border. We haven't done that yet, but we will be sure to research the rule and be prepared.

US Waiver For Canadians